While the 2008 Beijing Olympics called richly-deserved attention the economic success of China and showcased its proud citizenry and international might through gigantic, elaborate structures created for the Olympic Games and subsequent generations of Chinese athletes, the architecture of the 2012 London Olympics are more in line with the traditional British reserve with a dash of influence of the more austere economic environment.

But the Games will be remarkable.

Whatever the conditions, the London Olympics are bound to inspire and impress, elevate and entertain, undoubtedly and ubiquitously wherever one goes in London or via the television.

Newness and novelty will be part of the celebration, but at least two of the sports – the Olympic 10km Marathon Swim and the open water swim leg of the Olympic triathlon – will be celebrated in a venue that was created centuries ago.

The Serpentine, created in 1730 during the reign of Queen Caroline on the grounds of Hyde Park, will showcase the Olympic 10km Marathon Swim. The marathon swimmers will compete to the east of the Serpentine Bridge on the eastern half of the lake which marks the boundary between Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens.

On August 9th (women) and 10th (men), the Serpentine will be open water swimming’s equivalent of a grand international theater where the aquatic protagonists and antagonists will take center stage with stars and starlets, battling each other in a duel to the finish.

Copyright © 2011 by Open Water Source