Courtesy of Jenny Krusoe, AltaSea, Los Angeles, California.

AltaSea is a new 35-acre ocean-focused science innovation campus near the finish of Catalina Channel crossings at the Port of Los Angeles.

AltaSea Executive Director Jenny Krusoe explains, “AltaSea at the Port of Los Angeles accelerates scientific collaboration, facilitates job creation and inspires the next generation for a more sustainable ocean. Built on a historic pier with access to the deep ocean, AltaSea’s 35-acre campus brings people together to expand science-based understanding of the ocean; incubate and sustain ocean-related business; and pioneer new ocean-related education programs.”

AltaSea is committed to the Blue Economy, creating new research, education and job opportunities for the communities surrounding the Port of Los Angeles.

The first facility will be the La Kretz Blue Economy Incubator. The La Kretz Blue Economy Incubator will focus on finding and developing ocean-based start-up technology companies that create sustainable business models connected with the ocean. Aquapreneurs who are focused in Blue Tech and ocean mapping and monitoring will be specifically supported.

Philanthropist Morton La Kretz created and funds the La Kretz Blue Economy Incubator.

The Blue Economy Incubator is a crucial part of our broader vision to turn aging wharfs in the Port of Los Angeles into a vibrant, cutting-edge center for ocean-based science research, STEM education and sustainable business creation. Morton La Kretz’s support is a vital endorsement of that vision. He knows how important it is to invest in our future, creating the research and education structure that can help make our Los Angeles and indeed our entire planet healthier and more sustainable.”

Creating a healthier, sustainable planet is the key focus of my philanthropic work,” La Kretz said. “My first projects have been primarily about the land [LA Cleantech Incubator]. With the La Kretz Blue Economy Incubator at AltaSea, I can extend that reach to the oceans. The newest addition to AltaSea will attract the world-class leaders and promising companies that can leverage the opportunities our ocean presents for research, exploration and innovation.”

Part of the research and exploration will include collaboration with the world’s longest stage swim.

Ben Lecomte, a French-born architect living in Texas, will shift his base from Austin to the AltaSea campus. His 67-foot support vessel is being prepared for his planned six-month stage swim from Tokyo to San Francisco. His focus is now on highlighting plastics pollution in the North Pacific Ocean and collecting scientific data for a variety of research programs.

For more information, visit www.AltaSea.org.

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