Courtesy of WOWSA, Huntington Beach, California.

After being driven from the Molokai Channel last year by a menacing shark, Warren Wild of Albuquerque, New Mexico made his second attempt.

Last week, he started at 6 pm and swam through the night, only to get out of the water at 3 am defeated by the howling winds of Mother Nature. “There was gale channel warnings,” described channel maestro Linda Kaiser of the Kaiwi Channel Swimmers Association.

His chartered fishing boat was rocking and a rolling in the small craft advisories with winds 15-20 knots and seas 6-9 feet. He and his kayaker were just getting tossed around.

We all want to see swimmers succeed at crossing this channel. We want them to realize their dream. It makes us all joyous to see the smiles when they come onshore and we know how much this endeavor costs in terms of both time and money. Bill [Goding] and I do not want them to have to return to try again.”

The Kaiwi Channel Swimmers Association provides advice to aspiring channel swimmers. “It is an experience that we want to share with the world’s channel swimmers. Even though the water is warm in Hawaii, the channels remain a mean and unforgiving body of water.

Swimmers can visit our blog for more information and read everything. We have the how-to on everything needed from choosing an escort boat captain to where to stay and how to get to Molokai. Our listed escort captains are the best at bringing swimmers across the channel and we also provide kayak support and planning advice.

Bill and I track the swimmer’s progress and are in contact with the escort boat during the swim. We will be onshore to greet the swimmer no matter what time they finish. The swimmer receives a shell lei, a certificate and a well-deserved feeling of accomplishment
.”

Upper photo shows Warren Wild being escorted off the western shores of Molokai by the Chupu Sport Fishing Fleet. Second photo shows Bill Goding after his successful Molokai Channel crossing.

Copyright © 2015 by World Open Water Swimming Association