Courtesy of WOWSA, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island.

I grew up on the beaches of Narragansett Bay, which is where I fell in love with the water. That love helped me accomplish my dreams to represent Rhode Island and the United States in the Olympics,” said two-time Olympic swimming medalist Elizabeth Beisel.

I feel so fortunate to now have the chance to give back to the waters I learned to swim in.

That’s why I’m so excited to participate in the Save The Bay Swim. It’s so important to protect and restore our shorelines, beaches and Bay, and this is a perfect and seamless way for me to get involved. Let’s help save the Bay for the future Olympians of Rhode Island
.”

Beisel will serve as the Swim Ambassador for the 42nd Annual Save The Bay Swim on August 4th where she will make a speech, compete in the 1.7-mile event, and present the awards. Beisel will also lead two youth swim clinics, post information on Save The Bay blog and Twitter account.

It means so much to all of Save The Bay’s supporters and swimmers to have Elizabeth as our first-ever Swim Ambassador,” said Save The Bay Executive Director Jonathan Stone. “The annual Swim serves as, not only a fundraiser, but also a celebration of the recreational opportunities that become available when Narragansett Bay’s coastal resources are protected. Who better to help us spread that message than an accomplished Olympic swimmer, captain and team leader from right here in Rhode Island?

Change has come gradually in Narragansett Bay since the first event was held in 1977. Stone explained, “In the early years of the Swim, swimmers often emerged from the water with oil and tar balls on their skin and swimsuits. Conversely, during the last event, swimmers reported seeing schools of menhaden beneath them. With a goal of US$325,000, the Swim is Save The Bay’s largest annual fundraiser, providing critical support to the organization’s efforts to protect and improve Narragansett Bay and its watershed.”

For more information, visit swim.savebay.org.

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